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ADORABLE® MONTHLY JANUARY 2018

November 28, 2017 44 Comments

 

JANUARY 2018 THEME:

SMALL TOWN CHARM

There’s a certain charm that only small towns can possess and it truly radiates through books and music, movies and poems as some of the most captivating material ever to be conceived.

Enter Dio Candle Company.

Nostalgic familiarity is our speciality and it warms just about anybody’s heart with a deep sense of belonging. The candles going in this box are designed to strike you right in the feels. We’ve spent nearly 6 months concocting original blends to give this box theme the creativity and WOW factor it deserves.

If you’ve got a soft spot in your heart for small town girls… living in lonely worlds.. or if your favorite past time is meeting up with your friends at the neighborhood bar…where everybody knows your name… then this is the box for you!

 There’s a little something for everyone, kind of like a box of chocolates except…there’s no gross molasses chocolate left over. No really, if you’re the weirdo that likes that one.. just don’t buy this box on principle.

I mean it. We cant be friends. 

I’m a small town girl and I tell it like it is. Bless your heart.

PS: Bless your heart is Southern Slang… I’m not from the south... but I’m using it anyway... and that's the Jersey Spirit. 

 

For the rest of you cool kids.. you can buy THIS BOX HERE.

Sales for this box close on December 27th

 

Comment below a small town ‘slang’, euphemism or proverb for a chance to win this box for FREE.

 

*Minimum of 40 entries for there to be a winner! No double – commenting. That will be considered SPAM and you’ll ruin it for everyone. Don’t be that guy. Be cool. Tell your friends.





44 Responses

Jackie G
Jackie G

December 12, 2017

I’m originally from Iowa and it’s not really what we say but how we say it. My mom would always say warsh instead of wash. We would say bage instead of bag and a Coca Cola was pop not soda. When we moved to AZ all the kids in school said I sounded funny, apparently there is such a thing as a Midwest accent. My mom would also say things were asinine instead of calling them ridiculous, stupid, etc. I find myself doing that a lot now that I’m older. Also, my grandparents would call the couch a davenport and I thought that was hilarious.

Theresa Dicks
Theresa Dicks

December 11, 2017

My mother used to say "you’ll be waiting for that till the cows come home "

Megan Houde
Megan Houde

December 08, 2017

So my parents (old fashion) aren’t fans of the way some people dress, but one time this chick walked by when my mom and I were out shopping, and she as clear as day says “Her pants are so tight I can see her religion.” ? Apparently that’s appropriate! ???‍♀️

Kat
Kat

December 07, 2017

I’m from a super small town in LA (lower Alabama) although I don’t use the phrase I’ve heard it “slicker than owl snot” ??haha

Angela
Angela

December 06, 2017

In Wisconsin, we call a drinking fountain a “blubber”. In school we’d ask to go to the blubber! Students that moved from different states were so confused by this term!

Lea Mimeault
Lea Mimeault

December 05, 2017

I’m from Quebec and we often say “ayoye” but with that Quebecer accent and a huge emphasis “âyôyeee” to say that we’re impressed. It’s the equivalent of “wow”.

Breanne
Breanne

December 05, 2017

Well I am from a pretty small town where is took me about 15 mins just to get to the supermarket.. some slag I know is “North Jersey” most people think of places off the turnpike, well where I’m from it’s the nice woodsy part people dont know about.. another term only a New Jersey person can debate about is are they called “jimmies or sprinkles” lol

 Tonya
Tonya

December 05, 2017

I grew up in Small-Town Colorado. We called bigger cities by nicknames- Fort Collins (FOCO), Longmont (LOCO) Downtown Denver (LODO), Boulder (BOCO)…

Michael
Michael

December 05, 2017

I’m from Philadelphia, we say “yo” “ain’t” and “jabronie”. We also like whiz on our cheesesteaks and buy soft pretzels from street people.

Sophie
Sophie

December 05, 2017

I live in Greece and sometimes in my city instead of saying “But I told you”, we say “I told you but”. I know it’s wrong and makes no sense, but we do it anyway hahaha!

Melissa
Melissa

December 04, 2017

I can’t wait to see this box! I say ‘honey’ a lot since my friend kept saying.

Anna
Anna

December 04, 2017

I grew up in a small city with a walkable downtown area that had a very “small town” feel. I guess one proverb from my town would be “never swim in Coe Lake!” ?

Mary Jane Lingad
Mary Jane Lingad

December 04, 2017

I lived in a small town from birth till even after college. My generation loved to interchange the syllables of the words. So for example, astig = tigas. The literal translation is actually “hard” but if astig is used to describe you, it means you are strong and epic!

Also, it’s a town where the top source of employment is fishing and ship building. Only locals know where the “bulungan” is. Bulungan means whisperings. When you go there, people talk in hushed tones as they sell their fresh catch at dawn. The prices of sea foods at this time of day is very low. ? It’s fun! And you get to see all types of sea foods alive and kicking!

Kelsea
Kelsea

December 04, 2017

Oh gosh I’m sure I have phrases that I use that others wouldn’t, but the only thing I can think of right now is how my family always said “air con” and apparently no one where we lived (Portland, OR) said that – they all said “AC” and thought we were completely odd!

Kaitlin
Kaitlin

December 03, 2017

I swore as a child to never say it, but since moving away to college, I’ve started saying “Bless your heart” all the time. Why am I so southern? And where did this come from? Nobody I grew up with ever said it.

Irene
Irene

December 03, 2017

From a town in Southern Virginia, people say “It’s as cold outside as a witches teet” ?

Rosabella
Rosabella

December 03, 2017

“Y’uns” for everything
“Up in the Boone” for everything that isn’t mainstreet
“Beat you like a red headed step child”
“Bless your heart”
“Honey”
“Gumption” for nerve
“Mind you” for you to keep in mind
“That boy ain’t got a lick of sense”
You get the point

Kayla
Kayla

December 03, 2017

“Hono” is slang in our small town for our high school’s name!

Kate
Kate

December 03, 2017

My mom grew up in a little town in California and cursed my sister and I with the inescapable “dude.” I address any and everyone as “dude” at some point

Taylor Emerick
Taylor Emerick

December 03, 2017

I’m from a country town in NY state and I can’t think of any sayings we had exactly, but we all always have to go “No, I’m from NY State not NYC.” And we all are equally confused with the term “Upstate” (which is 95% of the state) and yet we say it anyway.

Nani
Nani

December 02, 2017

I live on Oahu, and we use “Townies” to refer to people who live in the city. Even though the island is small, the traffic here is insane and most of the time it takes an hour or two to get to the city.

Remmington
Remmington

December 02, 2017

I’m from Indiana and I hear “hotter than a billy blazin’ a lot” haha. Also I’m a teen and the word lit and high key is used so much its annoying lol ?

Becca S
Becca S

December 02, 2017

In Cleveland, OH, the lawn that is between the street and the sidewalk is called the “tree lawn.” When I lived in CA, and I was offhandedly mentioning that time I fell asleep on the tree lawn, and my friends were amazed it had a name and that it was apparently a regional name.

Kendra
Kendra

December 02, 2017

I’m from Napa, and for a little while someone thought it’d be funny to call locals “napkins.” I just…. no.

Tammy
Tammy

December 02, 2017

Useless as tits in a bull is by far the funniest I’ve heard. Haha someone who is not very helpful ??

Andrea
Andrea

December 02, 2017

Bless his heart. My granny’s way of saying your dumb while still be her polite self ?

Stephanie
Stephanie

December 02, 2017

“Six ways to Tuesday” something my mom and locals always said meaning to do something over and over.

Sammi
Sammi

December 02, 2017

Well I’m from Colorado and I’m not really sure if we say anything interesting, but my family and friends like to make fun of the people from out of state who put chains on their tires when it barely snows and wear heavy coats when it’s not even below 0.

Kathryn
Kathryn

December 02, 2017

I’m from southern Louisiana, so we use “y’all” all the time!

Margaret
Margaret

December 02, 2017

In Michigan’s upper peninsula where our cottage is they say “yah” and “don’t ya know”

Echo
Echo

December 02, 2017

“Eh” Because I am Canadian and it comes naturally while talking. “I got dough-dees” It wasn’t until I moved to the coast that I found out not everyone refers to donuts like that.

Zahra
Zahra

December 02, 2017

Well I’m from Sweden, near Gothenburg and the thing that we say a lot that might be a little weird is we add “shit” before a word like “shitfun” “shitdisgusting” “shitgood” and it’s just for like making it sound stronger ?? “shitgood” means like “very good”!

Deliliah Clapp
Deliliah Clapp

December 02, 2017

I’m from Massachusetts , park the car in Harvard yard lol . The slang here is I feel ya.

maryam
maryam

December 01, 2017

“Burger family” refers to people/families who are not into traditional stuff and belongs to high class (are very rich) :p

Kat Bryant
Kat Bryant

December 01, 2017

“Let’s go to town” due to the fact you live 20-30 minutes away from civilization.
“What’s the phone number for pizza”- me
“4527”- sister in law, because the first 6 digits are all the same for any phone number in your county lol ?

Jessica Russell
Jessica Russell

December 01, 2017

We us “city slickers” a lot. For anyone who is not from my small town of no where.

Ashley
Ashley

November 30, 2017

We use “fudgies” to refer to tourist or “yoopers” to refer to the people who live in the upper Penisula of Michigan

Vivien
Vivien

November 30, 2017

“Let’s blow this Popsicle stand!”
Let’s get out of here lol

Pam
Pam

November 29, 2017

I say this a lot lol.Useless as tits on a boar hog. I also call jeans (Britches), say over in the holler and many more. Took my husband years to understand half of what I say lol.

Juliah
Juliah

November 29, 2017

“Up north” is used for pretty much any location in my town in Minnesota :)

Miranda
Miranda

November 29, 2017

Bunny hug. Literally only a word where I’m from.
By the way it means sweater, the one with the hood but no zipper. Because I call it a bunny hug I have no idea what the real name for it is

Brianna
Brianna

November 29, 2017

Im from ny and mostly everything is a slang version lol we have. “Good looks” is saying like thanks for looking out for me. And “its brick” is its cold lol

Megan
Megan

November 29, 2017

I’m from Maine, and “you can’t get there from here”. Big state, minimal roads ?

Ashley Kemp
Ashley Kemp

November 28, 2017

Down yonder (in reference to any of a variety of locations lol)

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